The police and Canadian health care are overstepping their boundaries, and this has to stop

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS.

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Wikimedia Commons

Every other day we hear in the news that police are shooting Black Americans. The Black Lives Matter movement began in 2013 in an attempt to protest these senseless killings.[1] The movement sparked after a jury acquitted George Zimmerman, who fatally shot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman claimed he used Florida’s stand your ground self-defense.[2] Even when there are crimes, such force is not warranted, and Black Americans are overwhelmingly victims of the brutality. In Canada, Black Americans, indigenous, and visible minorities are often at the receiving end of such police shootings.

At the end of October in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, we had our first wake-up call when early morning on Thursday, October 29, 2020, police fatally shot 41-year-old Sheffield Matthews or the border of the quiet municipality of Cote Saint Luc in the west end of the city. Matthews was having mental distress and was wielding a knife; the moment he walked towards police with the knife, they shot him, he succumbed to his wounds in hospital shortly after. Instead of shooting to disable, the police shot to kill. [3] A report last year determined that Montreal police are four out of five more likely to stop Natives, Blacks, and other visual minorities in street checks.[4]


Dreaming of Equality: Francis Salvador, the American Jewish Revolutionary Patriot

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

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Dreaming of Equality: Francis Salvador, the American Jewish Revolutionary Patriot

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

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Bernard Zakheim’s Jewish Patriots of the American Revolution

On this day in history, September 7, 1787, Jewish Philadelphia merchant Jonas Philips wrote to President of the Constitutional Convention George Washington asking that the Constitution grant American Jews religious freedom and equality. Despite the American promise of civil rights and liberties, American Jews did not receive them by most of the original states of the new United States of America. All of the states except for New York did not grant Jews equality for political participation in their state constitutions. New York again became the first to grant Jews full equality. …


Dreaming of Equality: Francis Salvador, the American Jewish Revolutionary Patriot

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

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Bernard Zakheim’s Jewish Patriots of the American Revolution

On this day in history, August 1, 1776, South Carolina Provincial Congress representative Francis Salvador becomes the first Jewish casualty of the American Revolutionary War when a Cherokee native siding with the British killed and scalped him in battle. On January 11, 1775, Francis Salvador, the first Jew elected to a colonial public office began his tenure on the revolutionary South Carolina Provincial Congress. Salvador was a recent immigrant to America having arrived in Charleston, South Carolina from London in 1773, a year later, he was elected to the South Carolina assembly becoming the first Jew elected to a political body in modern history, and then in 1775, he was reelected to Second Provincial Congress. …


Dreaming of Equality: Francis Salvador, the American Jewish Revolutionary Patriot

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

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Dreaming of Equality: Francis Salvador, the American Jewish Revolutionary Patriot

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

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Bernard Zakheim’s Jewish Patriots of the American Revolution

By the time of the American Revolution, there were 2,000 to 2,500 Jews living in the colonies, they only represented one-tenth of a percent of the American population, which was about two million.[1] According to Hasia Diner, “Each of the five Jewish communities that existed on the eve of the American Revolution — New York, Philadelphia, Newport, Charleston, and Savannah — has its own history. In each the process of initial settlement, the consecration of a cemetery, formation of a congregation, and the building of a synagogue took place. In each Jews, both accepted their status in the larger society and sought to expand the rights they enjoyed.”


Dreaming of Equality: Francis Salvador, the American Jewish Revolutionary Patriot

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

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Bernard Zakheim’s Jewish Patriots of the American Revolution

At the time, the American Revolution broke out there were only 2,000 to 2,500 Jews in the American colonies, most concentrated in the six-port cities, New York, Philadelphia, Newport, Charleston, and Savannah with less than a hundred fighting in the war. While the majority of the Jewish population lived in the port cities, Jewish traders and shopkeepers lived in the outlying frontier regions “selling goods to fur trappers, buying from the Indians, and speculating in lands.” [1]

Jews’ first impression of the American colonies was hostile. In September 1654, twenty-three Jewish refugees arrived in the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam on Manhattan Island seeking asylum. Meeting the Jewish refugees on the dock was “Peter Stuyvesant, the director-general of the colony,” and “Johannes Megapolensis, an official of the Dutch Reformed Church,” who did not want any Jews settling in the colony. Stuyvesant severely restricted the Jews’ rights to live, worship, own, and trade in the colony while he was in power. As Dinnerstein observes, “The attitudes observed in the residents of New Amsterdam paralleled those of most other colonists.” [2] In the early years, most of the colonies limited non-Protestants, Jews, and Catholics’ ability on public worship and charged them “special taxes.” However, as Dinnerstein notes “most of these burdens were later lifted or rarely enforced.” [3] Despite legal limits on Jewish rights in their roles as merchants and traders they interacted with the Christian majority, and their interactions and relationships “must be specifically defined by time and place.”


By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

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The Jewish Position in Colonial America

On this day in history January 11, 1775, Francis Salvador, the first Jew elected to a colonial public office begins his tenure on the revolutionary South Carolina Provincial Congress. Salvador was a recent immigrant to America having arrived in Charleston, South Carolina from London in 1773, a year later, he was elected to the South Carolina assembly becoming the first Jew elected to a political body in modern history, and then in 1775, he was reelected to Second Provincial Congress. Salvador became a Whig and supported the colonial revolt and then the fight for independence from Great Britain. …


Significant Events in the Revolutionary Era, 1754–1812

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

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On This Day in the History of American Independence 1754 to 1812, the thirteen American colonies under the British Empire declared independence and twice beat the mightiest military power in the world. This is the story of the American Revolution told from significant dates and events that changed the course of history. The story starts with the French-Indian War in 1754, through adopting the Declaration of Independence in 1776, and ending with the War of 1812 in 1815. Americans gained their independence from Britain and became the first modern democracy in the world. …


By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

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Source: Caleb Jones, newsobserver.com

Renting in the age of Covid-19 tenants need more rights and freedoms

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

This Elul as we introspect ask forgiveness from others and Hashem we look to rabbis as our spiritual guides. What happens when a rabbi surprises you and behaves against his position? I rent a duplex from a rabbi emeritus in the Montreal Jewish community. Some of his attitudes during the Covid-19 pandemic shocked me but nothing more than what happened this past week. This pandemic has caused an economic downturn and recession that has left tenants unable to pay rent because of the vast job losses putting them at risk of evictions. According to sociologist Matthew Desmond in his New York Times article, “The Rent Eats First, Even during a Pandemic,” “Today, with unemployment levels unseen since the Great Depression and the expiration of federal benefits along with national and several state eviction moratoriums, millions of renters are at risk of losing their homes by the end of the year.”

About

Bonnie K. Goodman

Bonnie K. Goodman BA, MLIS (McGill University) is a Professional Librarian (CBPQ) & historian. Former editor @ History News Network & reporter @ Examiner.com.

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